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Health Hazards Detection
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The environment is surrounded by health hazards.

Asbestos, bacteria, carbon monoxide, lead in paint, lead in water, mold, pesticides, radon gas, water quality are frequently at the source of health problems. Hazard detection tests are available.


Asbestos is a health hazard in many homes, offices and schools. Asbestos exposure can cause lung cancer

If you or a loved one develop mesothelioma, check out fightmesothelioma.com for legal advice.

An estimated 20,000 people will die each year for the next 30 years from asbestos exposure.
 

Asbestos is made up of microscopic bundles of fibers that may become airborne when distributed.
These fibers get into the air and may become inhaled into the lungs, where they may cause
significant health problems. Researchers still have not determined a "safe level" of exposure but
we know the greater and the longer the exposure, the greater the risk of contracting an asbestos
related disease

Bacterial contamination causes severe digestive problems, fever, nausea, diarrhea and sometimes even death. According to the EPA, total coliform and E. coli bacteria testing is recommended twice a year.

Carbon monoxide is an odorless, tasteless, and colorless gas which is caused by incomplete combustion of fossil fuels from gasoline, kerosene, natural gas, butane, propane, fuel oil, wood or coal and any other type of fuel.

It is estimated that carbon monoxide causes as many as 1,000 deaths per year in the United States.

More than 200,000 children in the United States contract lead poisoning every year. 
Lead poisoning limits a child’s ability to learn, even after a short term exposure. It is estimated that a child’s I.Q. drops 3 points for every 10 micrograms per deciliter of lead in their blood. If the child receives prompt medical attention, chances for recovery are very good. However, if the exposure goes undetected, it can bring about permanent damage, causing anything from learning disabilities to severe mental retardation and even death. Children under the age of 7 are much more susceptible to lead poisoning because their developing bodies absorb the lead at 4 times the rate of an adult.

Compounding this medical danger is the fact that one of the most common places for children to become exposed to lead is in the home. The major sources of in-home contamination are lead-based paints, tap water, colorful ceramic dishes, soil and airborne lead particles. Because you can’t see, taste or smell lead, everyone is potentially at risk

Pesticide ingestion and inhalation can damage internal organs, cause cancer, and eventually death. The World Health Organization estimates that one-half of the ground and well water in the U.S. is contaminated with pesticides, resulting in 20,000 deaths per year.

Medical studies have found that mold is the #1 cause of allergic symptoms. The black mold Stachybotrys found in home, office and school environments has been linked to fatal pulmonary disorders.

Molds are microscopic organisms, found virtually everywhere, indoors and outdoors. Molds can be found on plants, foods, dry leaves, and other organic material. Also susceptible to mold growth are cellulose materials, such as, cardboard, paper, ceiling tiles, and sheet rock. Mold spores are easily detached and made airborne by vacuuming, walking on a carpet or sitting on a couch. In indoor environments, mold can grow in air conditioning ducts, carpets, pots of houseplants, etc.

Exposure to mold is not healthy for anyone but the following individuals are at a higher risk for adverse health effects: infants, children, elderly, immune compromised patients, pregnant women, and individuals with existing respiratory conditions. When inhaled, even in small amounts, mold can cause a wide range of health problems including respiratory problems (wheezing), nasal and sinus congestion, watery and red eyes, nose and throat irritation, skin irritation, aches and pains, fevers, asthma, emphysema and in some cases even death.

Pesticides can have an array of adverse health impacts on adults and children, ranging from acute poisonings to cancer, brain damage, and reproductive harm.

Radon is an invisible and odorless radioactive gas which occurs naturally from decaying uranium underneath the earth's surface. Though you cannot see, smell, or taste radon, it is there and may be a problem in your home or office. Radon gas rises through the soil and seeps through cracks, holes, and drain pipes in the foundation or basements of buildings.

Radon gas can be found all over the United States, and according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) 1 out of every 15 homes in the United States has high levels of radon gas.

Radon
gas contains radioactive particles which get trapped in your lungs every time you take a breath. As these particles break down, they release bursts of radiation that damage or destroy lung tissue and cause lung cancer, and long-term exposure may even cause death.

Some experts believe the toxins in our drinking water are the number one health threat causing cancer, heart disease and lead poisoning. Such chronic illnesses are brought on by the body's absorption. Water contaminants not only affect our health, but they can also corrode fixtures, stain and deteriorate clothing and household surfaces, alter the taste of food and drinking water.

  • Chlorine: Chlorinating water is necessary for disinfecting; however, over-chlorination produces by-products known as trihalomethanes. One trihalomethane, chloroform, is a known carcinogen. 
  • Nitrate/Nitrite: is a chemical that seeps our drinking water from fertilizer, sewage, feed lots and other geological elements. Nitrate over 10 ppm reduces the amount of oxygen available to the fetus in pregnant women causing "Blue Baby Syndrome" (methemoglobulinemia). It is also considered an immediate threat to children 6 months to 1 year old, and is a major health threat to adults.
  • Iron: is a mineral found in the ground that leaches into drinking water. Although a certain amount of iron is essential to good health, iron levels above .3 ppm cause water to taste bitter, stain and discolor our laundry, fixtures and hair. It is listed under the secondary standards for water.
  • Water hardness: is a measure of calcium and magnesium in water, neither of which are potential health risks in and of themselves



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